Time Constraints

I'm coming towards the end of my last section of my Analysis. I'm probably about half-way through the last book. After that, I have to answer the last question in my Analysis assignment, proof read the whole thing and submit it.

I have the whole of today, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday before I need to submit this Analysis assignment. To make sure I can submit this assignment in time, and get ahead for my next section (Group Theory Part 2), I've taken the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday as holiday days. That'll make a total of 5 days I've taken off work since the beginning of January just to make sure I'm where I want to be with my study.

There's a ebb and flow to where I am with my study compared to where I should be, and I won't truly understand how well I managed my time until this whole module is over in June, but I sure wasn't expecting I'd have to use holiday days to catch up on study.

One of the most frustrating things about feeling like you're behind is the nagging feeling like you don't have sufficient time to learn the materials sufficiently. This slight panic creeps in and you realise that more than anything else, you need to reach the end of the section (to be able to move on to the related assignment question). So you learn it JUST well enough to move on. Of ALL the sections for this to happen on, it had to happen with Analysis didn't it. The section I was most nervous about.

So in summary, because I've found myself short on time, I'm having to practically rush through the section on Analysis. No time for playing with concepts, no time to study the proofs in depth (or at all in some cases). Just time to get the general gist, and move on.

Something I will say is that I haven't found it necessary to keep a spider diagram of how core concepts relate to one another. Because of the structure of the learning materials I find it fairly easy to see the links and how one theory supports another proof and so on.

What has been a surprise while studying analysis is that there hasn't been a need to write any proofs in quite the same way as I was expecting. It turns out that (so far, at least) there isn't a need to have an in-depth understanding of logical notation or concepts. You need a basic understanding of the "if x, then y" structure, and the consequential converse "If not y, then not x", and so on, but not a great deal more. I'm not sure whether I'm grateful for this or not. Some of the concepts in Analysis require all my brain power, so I'm not sure the additional logical puzzles on top of that would help. Though on the other hand, having a decent foundation in logic feels quite important. I suppose, again, I'll have formed a more solid opinion on this by the end of the module.

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